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Thread: Best Canon DSLR and Lens combination for Video

  1. #1
    pradeep jain
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    Default Best Canon DSLR and Lens combination for Video

    Hello Friends,
    If i were to select the best dslr and lens combination for a decent wildlife video, which would u suggest
    5D Mark2/7D
    300 F2.8 or some other lens

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    Pradeep,

    Selecting a DSLR for video is similar to selecting a DSLR for still images. It depends on what you want to do. If you want distant subjects and the subject will be small in the frame were you are focal length limited, you want a cropped sensor. If you can fill the subject in the frame (choose your lens and focal length), then a full frame DSLR would be great. I think on some DSLRs (e.g. 7D???) one can choose full sensor, or full pixel, in which case that you be ideal for subjects small in the frame. Can someone confirm this? The advantage of full frame DSLR (e.g. 5D2) is the pixels are combined to use the full width of the sensor providing stunning low light performance, but with loss of resolution.

    For wildlife action continuous AF with phase detect autofocus would be nice, and I believe only the new Sony with the permanent half-silvered mirror can do that.

    Roger

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    The 5D MkII is considered the industry standard for video at the moment. When they included video functions in DSLRs, they did not imagine that it was going to be such a success. What is appreciated in shooting videos with DSLRs is the shallow depth of field, which you can not achieve with video cameras below 20k dollars. However, shooting video with DSLRs means manual focus, which, combined with shallow depth of field, might not be what you want to look for wildlife. A professional video camera has still the edge over a DSLR for wildlife. Another important aspect that DSLRs lack compared to video cameras is good audio capacity, which for video is as much important as good image. If you are buying a lens just for video, I would look for a second-hand manual focus lens, which is more suitable for achieving critical manual focus. Expect then a steep learning curve with the post-production softwares.
    Having said that, I am having fun experimenting video with my D3s and discovering a whole new world. Suddenly photography has become very easy :eek:

    Giulio
    Last edited by Giulio Zanni; 03-04-2011 at 06:49 PM.

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    Giulio,

    I simply focus before turnign on the video, letting the camera autofocus. Of course this only works for subjects that stay the same distance from the camera. If the distance changes, I stop the video, go back to still mode and focus, or press the shutter and take a still image, which sets focus. I do this because I find it difficult (for me) to get a great focus on the small screen on the back of the camera.

    Regarding sound, buy a good microphone. I just got a Rode VideoMic Pro microphone and used it on my recent safari in Tanzania. It worked great--superb sound.

    Roger
    Last edited by Roger Clark; 03-04-2011 at 09:59 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Clark View Post

    Regarding sound, buy a good microphone. I just got a Rode VideoMic Pro microphone and used it on my recent safari in Tanzania. It worked great--superb sound.

    Roger
    I used to have a Sennheiser 400 mounted on the hot-shoe of my camera. However, it's on the camera. While for wildlife you need a long a reach, the mic is also catching all other sounds in between. Most videographer now use double system and merge video and sound in post. A device like the Zoom H4n is used to record sound separately. Giulio

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Clark View Post
    Pradeep,

    I think on some DSLRs (e.g. 7D???) one can choose full sensor, or full pixel, in which case that you be ideal for subjects small in the frame. Can someone confirm this?

    Roger
    Roger,
    The new 600D has this feature. This feature would be available in the new canon introductions as well.

    Cheers,
    Sabyasachi

  7. #7
    Eugene Malcovich
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    Try this one Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS[/URL]
    Last edited by James Shadle; 07-31-2011 at 06:46 PM.

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    You need to be careful about the lens breathing, severe in most of the zooms. 70-200 f2.8 is better in that respect.

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    Suddenly photography has become very easy
    No kidding! Photoshop is now "easy" too.

    A device like the Zoom H4n is used to record sound separately. Giulio
    I just picked up an H4N and I love it.

    I noticed that if you are shooting from a tripod and not moving IS can introduce some motion to the video. I have been turning IS off when I film.

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