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Thread: Video DSLR Assistance Respectfully Requested!

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    Default Video DSLR Assistance Respectfully Requested!

    I reside along a creek that, over the winter, hosts hundreds of visiting Tundra Swans. These magnificent birds travel here from the North Slope of Alaska, and from other points North. Their beauty and interesting behavior are something to behold.

    Yesterday, I used my new Nikon D7000 camera in video mode to capture some of the swan's actions on the creek. I thus have a 20-second clip that I would like to share with others on BPN. But I don't know how to do it.

    The problem is that my file is in .MOV format, and although the video clip runs only 20 seconds, it has a whopping 25 MB size! It needs to be converted to some other format that can be transmitted on the web, and that BPN will accept.

    The BPN DSLR Video Critique guidelines for posting are not yet available. And while I have been accused of many things, computer technology savvy is not one of them! :icon7:

    Would someone, anyone, please tell me how I can share my Tundra Swan images with my friends on BPN?

    Norm
    Last edited by Norm Dulak; 01-18-2011 at 09:07 AM.

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    Wish I could help you on the video question.... but if I may... I am awfully interested in getting a D7000. There have been virtually no bird photos posted to these forums using that camera. If you happened to catch any stills of your swans with the D7k, I'd love to view samples!

    I'm beginning to wonder if the D7000 is disappointing folks who might use it for bird photography, based on the fact that it appears "on paper" to offer numerous characteristics one would like to have... and yet... it's been out awhile....where are the photos? :)

    Good luck with the video!

    Tim

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim F Williams View Post
    Wish I could help you on the video question.... but if I may... I am awfully interested in getting a D7000. There have been virtually no bird photos posted to these forums using that camera. If you happened to catch any stills of your swans with the D7k, I'd love to view samples!

    I'm beginning to wonder if the D7000 is disappointing folks who might use it for bird photography, based on the fact that it appears "on paper" to offer numerous characteristics one would like to have... and yet... it's been out awhile....where are the photos? :)

    Good luck with the video!

    Tim
    Hi Tim. I'm afraid that I can't help you much here, since I don't have many still images captured with the D7000. I did post a snow goose image on BPN, which is here: http://www.birdphotographers.net/for...aggle+of+geese.

    I've also attached an image of a flight of snow geese here.

    Mike Moats has also posted some excellent macro images captured with a D7000. One of them is here: http://www.birdphotographers.net/for...erbera-Daisies.

    Hope that helps a little.

    Norm

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    Moving to DSLR Video Discussion forum...
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    There is a pretty good tutorial on compressing a file here. DVInfo has regularly running contests often with some nice looking nature footage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Michael View Post
    There is a pretty good tutorial on compressing a file here. DVInfo has regularly running contests often with some nice looking nature footage.
    Thanks Jim.

    What I've learned so far on my own is that after I downloaded the video clip from the camera's SD card to my iMac, I was able to click on the file and play it using QuickTime. That provided a drop-down menu allowing me to convert the .MOV file to another format for sharing via iPods, cell phones or computers. The computer format is MPEG-4.

    I then sent the MPEG-4 file via gmail to my wife, and she could download and view the video clip. However, when I sent the MPEG-4 file to others, some of whom don't have Macs, I received some notices of failure to deliver my messages.

    So it seems that nothing is easy in the brave new world of DSLR Video! :(

    Again, what I need is a clear way to share my video clip on BPN! As a fallback position, I suppose I could send my video clip to YouTube, where I have recently opened an account and to which I could provide a link on BPN.

    But can't BPN, with its otherwise excellent web site, do better than that? Would the powers that be at BPN please step forward and provide an answer to my inquiry?

    For those of you who like me are impatient, I've now posted my swans on You Tube at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lsFRj4Eh3Zw. Please check them out!

    Norm
    Last edited by Norm Dulak; 01-19-2011 at 09:56 AM.

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    It's a pity that there is so little interest in, or understanding of, video DSLR on BPN, because it is such a superior medium for capturing the behavior of animals and birds. Sharp, colorful still photos of birds in flight or on perches with perfect head angles have value, but my interest in them has diminished considerably in view of the greater rewards offered by the new technology.

    Those who have taken the time to view my little video clip of the Tundra Swan family at the link above tend to agree with me. But I suspect that video DSLR will not be important at BPN anytime soon.

    For those of you who are impatient and want to see and share videos of the antics of birds being birds, the excellent web site for avian enthusiasts worldwide, birdfourm.net, is up to date and thriving. There, at the link: http://www.birdforum.tv/members/ you can send videos in a wide range of formats, for all the world to enjoy.

    Norm

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    It's been some time since I last did the conversion but used Sorenson to make x-platform compatible and adjusted the data rate to get the file size down to a reasonable level. Sorenson was used in Flash for some time, although I think they moved to another one around v. 8. Other suggestions in the link I posted referenced using mpeg-1. Thanks for posting the link to the bird forum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Michael View Post
    It's been some time since I last did the conversion but used Sorenson to make x-platform compatible and adjusted the data rate to get the file size down to a reasonable level. Sorenson was used in Flash for some time, although I think they moved to another one around v. 8. Other suggestions in the link I posted referenced using mpeg-1. Thanks for posting the link to the bird forum.
    And thanks Jim, for the additional info.

    In addition to video format conversion, there are the issues of editing, color adjustments etc., etc. While I've become somewhat adept at adjusting still images using PS CS5 and Viveza, video opens up a whole new, complex world. There is so much to learn!

    I once posted a thread on BPN in which I speculated on whether involvement in photography, considering how much had to be learned in making good exposures and in perfecting images PP, might tend to keep our minds sharper as we grow older. But if still photography can do that, imagine what mastering video will do!

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    It certainly leads to the need to develop a bigger set of tools, and expand on the ones you have. For example color grading involves not just getting the color and contrast in a shot right but making things look consistent across a transition; the one occurring around :40 is a little green compared to the previous scene in this trailer I made a couple of years ago from footage shot in Alaska. Then there's the whole issue of audio, which I think makes or breaks a film.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Michael View Post
    It certainly leads to the need to develop a bigger set of tools, and expand on the ones you have. For example color grading involves not just getting the color and contrast in a shot right but making things look consistent across a transition; the one occurring around :40 is a little green compared to the previous scene in this trailer I made a couple of years ago from footage shot in Alaska. Then there's the whole issue of audio, which I think makes or breaks a film.
    A most interesting trailer Jim; it really puts the viewer into a special place. And you are so right about the need for the necessary tools.

    I shot and posted my video clip hastily, because I thought that the action of the swans was so special that I wanted to immediately share it with others. But my initial effort was obviously primitive.

    Even though I used a tripod, my video clip shot with a telephoto lens needs the stabilization that software can provide. Then there are color adjustments, sound, and melding my clip into a moving portrait of the lives of the Tundra Swans that I plan to produce.

    It's been a good experience for me, and one that I look forward to developing over the years.

    Norm

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    Well thanks to everyone who has at least looked at this posting, and to those few who have actually ventured to comment. This experience has been a bit of an eye opener for me, because I thought more might come from it.

    Why BPN has so little apparent regard for exploiting and developing the power of video DSLR is a mystery to me, when others recognize its value. Why, of all the BPN forums, is there not a single moderator for this one?

    I hope that BPN can and will do better in this regard in the future, because this web site is otherwise excellent. It is cutting edge in most respects except for video DSLR. For those who, like me, wish to exploit this technology, there are alternatives, including YouTube and the birdforum site mentioned above. There is also NatureScapes, which has a forum entitled "Video Sharing and Discussion", with two moderators.

    Anyway, I look forward to seeing more video contributions from BPN members in the future, one way or another.

    Norm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Norm Dulak View Post
    Again, what I need is a clear way to share my video clip on BPN! As a fallback position, I suppose I could send my video clip to YouTube, where I have recently opened an account and to which I could provide a link on BPN.

    But can't BPN, with its otherwise excellent web site, do better than that? Would the powers that be at BPN please step forward and provide an answer to my inquiry?
    Video files are not currently a supported file type that can be uploaded to the BPN server. YouTube would be a perfect solution to host your videos as their resources (storage and bandwidth) are virtually limitless.
    I think if you looked at the current forum people are sharing their videos with http://www.birdphotographers.net/for...ideo-Critiques you would have noticed this is where most, if not all of the current videos are being hosted.

    As far as BPN doing better, what do you suggest? The Mods and Admins are always open to suggestions and we always discuss new ideas even though everyone might not see it. Not everything suggested is implemented but it is at least considered and hashed out.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Ober View Post
    Video files are not currently a supported file type that can be uploaded to the BPN server. YouTube would be a perfect solution to host your videos as their resources (storage and bandwidth) are virtually limitless.
    I think if you looked at the current forum people are sharing their videos with http://www.birdphotographers.net/for...ideo-Critiques you would have noticed this is where most, if not all of the current videos are being hosted.

    As far as BPN doing better, what do you suggest? The Mods and Admins are always open to suggestions and we always discuss new ideas even though everyone might not see it. Not everything suggested is implemented but it is at least considered and hashed out.
    Hi Chris. Thanks for your comments. Here are a few suggestions.

    *Assign a moderator to this forum to facilitate discussion and provide his/her expertise.

    *Encourage submission of video clips where appropriate, such as to the Friends and Family forum.

    *While many videos are submitted to the DSLR Video Critiques forum, that is in fact a critique forum.
    Not all videos submitted merit or expect formal critiquing. My clip presently does not, and it won't until I work it into a more formal video, with stabilization, corrections, editing etc. I will do that, but for now I simply wanted to show the remarkable behavior of the swans in my raw footage.

    *Provide posting guidelines for the DSLR Video Critiques forum.

    *Establish a casual video submission forum for birds or animals, where formal critiques are not desired.

    *Increase BPN server capacity to accommodate the larger video files, or provide a tutorial on submission to YouTube or similar systems with links to BPN.

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    I would also suggest renaming the forum to "Video Critiques Forum" and open it to video from other than DSLRs, which aren't necessarily the best thing with which to shoot wildlife & nature video.

    Vimeo is another good spot to post your work.

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    Hi Norm,

    I agree with what you say. It is surprising the video has not taken off more. I think it may be because most DSLR photographers come from a still image background and do not have video experience.

    I have an interest in video, but am a rank amateur at it. For ~30 years I have taken video of family, and tried hard to find a good video camera to take on my last trip to Tanzania (2009), but all consumer and even some pro video cameras (up to about $10,000 range) had small sensors and produced relatively poor results.

    Then I got a 5D2 (in time for the Africa trip), but I was so stunned with the still-image quality, I did very little video. Most video I have done in the last 2 years has been weddings. The few videos I did on the Africa trip had poor sound--mainly because the animals were so far away, even though large in the frame of the 500 mm. I think sound is similarly important as the video.

    I just bought a what should be a great microphone: Rode VideoMic Pro (just came in stock at B&H and I just got mine today). I will test it this weekend.

    So I hope to post videos in the future. I'm also going to make a 6-inch to 8-inch dish reflector to add to the Rode microphone to get good sound from a distance with my 500 mm lens.

    One thing that is immediately apparent with HD video: pan much slower than one might think!

    I think HD video of the quality from large sensor DSLRs is a major wave of the future.

    Roger

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Clark View Post
    Hi Norm,

    I agree with what you say. It is surprising the video has not taken off more. I think it may be because most DSLR photographers come from a still image background and do not have video experience.

    I have an interest in video, but am a rank amateur at it. For ~30 years I have taken video of family, and tried hard to find a good video camera to take on my last trip to Tanzania (2009), but all consumer and even some pro video cameras (up to about $10,000 range) had small sensors and produced relatively poor results.

    Then I got a 5D2 (in time for the Africa trip), but I was so stunned with the still-image quality, I did very little video. Most video I have done in the last 2 years has been weddings. The few videos I did on the Africa trip had poor sound--mainly because the animals were so far away, even though large in the frame of the 500 mm. I think sound is similarly important as the video.

    I just bought a what should be a great microphone: Rode VideoMic Pro (just came in stock at B&H and I just got mine today). I will test it this weekend.

    So I hope to post videos in the future. I'm also going to make a 6-inch to 8-inch dish reflector to add to the Rode microphone to get good sound from a distance with my 500 mm lens.

    One thing that is immediately apparent with HD video: pan much slower than one might think!

    I think HD video of the quality from large sensor DSLRs is a major wave of the future.

    Roger
    Hi Roger. You've made some interesting comments here.

    Most of us are indeed rank amateurs at the new video medium. But it really seems to be something worth exploring. There is a lot to learn, from controlling panning as you have said while shooting, to processing afterwards using computer software. The video clip I posted on YouTube was submitted as shot. But as you can see the camera was not entirely steady. That's a problem that of course is magnified by long telephoto lenses. Fortunately, software can fix that.

    Even the simple iMovie software that came with my iMac can analyze a video clip frame-by-frame, detect slight changes in camera position, and then "stabilize" the clip. I've done that to my swan clip, and the effect is amazing.

    The sound for my video was produced by the camera's microphone, and I think it's a good reproduction of the swans' vocalizations. But to reach out to capture sound at a distance, your proposed rig should be very good. Also, if there is a strong wind I suspect that the in-camera microphone wouldn't be so good. A shielded, separate microphone would no doubt be better.

    Good luck in your exploration of DSLR video!

    Norm

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    I have been grappling with video ever since I bought the Mark IV in Jan 2010. I think there are several issues why video has not take off in BPN. Video is a new area and not many have readily taken to it. It has a language of its own. You can't just focus, press your button and then crop and post like stills. Have you sat through watching someone's family video captured through a camcorder? It is terribly boring. The reason is video needs tight editing to make a short clip out of the footage you have.

    Editing is a challenge. Unlike stills, it needs powerful computers.

    The investments on video is going through the roof.

    For sound, I bought a Sennheiser MKH 416 plus Rycote zeppelin and windjammer, mixers, audio recorders etc.

    Yet to get a fluid head and video tripod. Panning without a fluid head is terrible, even with the Wimberly V2 head that I use.

    I am really challenged for time due to work pressures. So editing all the footage into a film will take some time. Hope to share with you guys soon.

    Uploading an image taken in early 2010 with my initial video gears. The tripod is a Gitzo with Wimberly V2. It is just not suitable for smooth panning. I am in the process of getting a high end fluid head - unfortunately it costs more than my Mark IV. The lens is a 400mm f2.8 L IS USM. Camera is 1D Mark IV. Sennheiser MKH 416 microphone with a rycote softie mounted on the flash bracket.

    A mixer is attached at the bottom of the camera and the closed headphone helps in monitoring the sound recorded. Ofcourse, these days I try to record sound separately.

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    Sabyasachi,

    Very interesting setup. I've been planning to add headphones, as a couple of times I found post acquisition that the sound was bad (thankfully all the weddings came out fine). Can you not get sound out of the camera (camera to headphones directly) with the 1D4? I don't have the adapters but thought it might be possible. Otherwise, what small mixer are you using?

    Roger

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    It's true that after you start buying video equipment everything for still photography seems pretty inexpensive, e.g. really good video cameras start about where your long lenses are priced. A good video head should be able to start and stop a pan without any jerking or backlash, and balance so that it stays in position wherever you tilt the head. Motion is magnified with a long lens - something to try with your W II - most likely you won't be able to get a smooth start and stop motion. For audio, consider either placing a recorder close to the subject or a wireless system like the Sennheiser G2. Wind will destroy your audio so make sure whatever mics you use have windscreens appropriate for the amount of wind. Be aware that a 'shotgun' mic doesn't reach out to pick up distant sounds, it just has a smaller region of sensitivity. You need to have your mic close to the source if possible.

    A few years ago independent filmmakers started using adapters that allowed video cameras with small chips to achieve narrow dof like 35mm cinema. Then Canon came along and released the DSLR with 1080p and now there is a big narrow dof craze that has video camera makers scrambling to produce inexpensive video cameras with large chips, e.g. Sony F3 and Panasonic AF100. But one question you have to ask yourself is, if you are shooting wildlife video, do you really want that narrow dof, and can you live with the smaller magnification you get with the larger sensor for a given focal length? Seems like a 2/3" or 1/2" sensor camera makes more sense.

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    It's been a pleasure to see the latter contributions to this thread. Very informative! And from what has been said, two things have become clear to me.

    First, there are always two ways to approach a subject such as DSLR video -- the "cost-is-no-object" approach and the "shoestring budget" approach. Secondly, I am firmly in the shoestring budget camp!

    Be it resolved, therefore, that before the Tundra Swans on my creek wend their way northward to build their new families, I will create videos of them from my own back yard and using the equipment I now have. I will hope to capture their magnificent takeoffs and landings, their pair bonding, and the uninhibited joy they often exude as spring migration approaches.

    My only microphone will be the one in my Nikon D7000 camera body. And my only "mixer" will be the one I use to prepare a strong cocktail, if my efforts are successful!
    But thanks everyone for your contributions to this fascinating subject!

    Norm
    Last edited by Norm Dulak; 01-30-2011 at 04:10 PM.

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    Norm,
    If you use any VR lens, the noise from the VR will be recorded by the internal microphone. Even a simple $50 microphone that mounts in the hot shoe mount and is isolated (e.g. rubber mount) will do a much better job.

    Roger

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Clark View Post
    Norm,
    If you use any VR lens, the noise from the VR will be recorded by the internal microphone. Even a simple $50 microphone that mounts in the hot shoe mount and is isolated (e.g. rubber mount) will do a much better job.

    Roger
    Is that true even if the VR is switched off?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Clark View Post
    Sabyasachi,

    Very interesting setup. I've been planning to add headphones, as a couple of times I found post acquisition that the sound was bad (thankfully all the weddings came out fine). Can you not get sound out of the camera (camera to headphones directly) with the 1D4? I don't have the adapters but thought it might be possible. Otherwise, what small mixer are you using?

    Roger
    Roger,

    You can't just plug in a headphone into the camera. In the image, the mixer fitted at the bottom of the Mark IV is a JuicedLink DT454.

    The cameras like Mark IV have AGC (Auto gain). To defeat auto gain, the juicedLink DT454 has got an option of introducing a tone. So the camera is fooled into believing and doesn't react to sudden sounds like calling of a bird etc.

    For cameras like 5DII which got firmware update to include manual control of levels, you don't need to introduce a tone to bypass AGC as manual control is introduced. By using a headphone, you are able to control (move up or bring down) the gain (or volume) as required. It costs about 425 USD and for that price the amplification is good.

    After using the combination as in the previous image, I found that at times if the wind is high, the rycote softie though good, is not enough and wind sound is recorded.

    So I bought a full blimp from rycote. However, that has a pistol grip and can't be mounted on a camera. Image included.

    The best possible sound is recorded when the microphone is close to the source of sound. So the best bet is always using a microphone off camera.

    The camera has got an option to record sound on its own through its own internal microphone, however, it picks up all kinds of noise including IS and sound of changing the aperture dial.

    In the present image (please don't critique it :( it is not of great quality), I was trying to get in close to a Lion-Tailed Macaque (Macaca silenus). Its an endangered species however, a small group can be found close to a small town. I am holding a juicedlink mixer DT 454 and a small portable recorder (Tascam DR 100). Though I could move in to about close, the poor thing got terrified due to the blimp and stopped calling. :(

    Cheers,
    Sabyasachi

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    With the Nikon D7000 camera in video mode, whether the internal microphone picks up internally generated noise depends upon the lens. There is no problem at all with the 38-300mm f/3.5-5.6 VR lens with the VR switched off. But when the 300mm f/4 + 1.4X TC is used, a periodic chattering sound is heard that ruins the video. To overcome this problem, I have ordered a Rode VideoMic Pro microphone.

    It has also become apparent that no matter how slowly and carefully I try to pan using a Markins M-20/Wimberley Sidekick setup, I cannot get a sufficiently smooth result. I've therefore taken the modest step of ordering a SLIK 504QF-II Video Fluid Head. While costing only about $65 at B&H, this head supports 11 pounds and receives respectable reviews from its users, a number of whom identify themselves as pro photographers. I'll see whether that helps.
    Last edited by Norm Dulak; 02-01-2011 at 07:23 AM.

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    To repeat what Jim M says above-
    "But one question you have to ask yourself is, if you are shooting wildlife video, do you really want that narrow dof, and can you live with the smaller magnification you get with the larger sensor for a given focal length? Seems like a 2/3" or 1/2" sensor camera makes more sense."

    Shooting both stills and (crude) video, I have have been wondering same. Video in some ways is more forgiving than stills but in more ways not. So when watching professional wildlife programs, eg. Nat Geo, I've been trying to note the DOF. In general I'd say DOF is "large" not shallow. Would it -not- look "right" to see a lion walking isolated from the environment? Or a cheetah chase with a background of totally cloud soft bokeh? A still photo "mug" shot of a lion I would submit is a different message (Marshall McLuhan) than a video clip of same. And, I think video background, especially for moving wildlife with panning on the subject, makes its "own" unique "soft, out-of focus" background, as in real life.

    I wonder if any studies have been made about all this? If any university film schools teach such, applying the technical differences of still and video, focus, DOF, film grain, for the desired emotional impact for the audience?

    Tom

  27. #27
    pradeep jain
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    Dear Norm,
    I do not think am knowledgeable about DSLR Video/Video compression techniques as asked by you in this theread.
    I wish to tell you your video of Thundra Geese is simply outstanding and Fantabulous!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by pradeep jain View Post
    Dear Norm,
    I do not think am knowledgeable about DSLR Video/Video compression techniques as asked by you in this theread.
    I wish to tell you your video of Thundra Geese is simply outstanding and Fantabulous!!!
    Thanks Pradeep. I'm so glad you enjoyed it!

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    I scrolled through quickly so I may have missed the explanation for how to share video here. Vimeo is a good place to host your video files. To post here just copy and paste the URL of your video to the body of a post and it will show up here. I have a UTube account too but I tend to post more to Vimeo.

    I just picked up a ZOOM H4N audio recorder to use for recording audio. So far I have found it to be an extremely good tool for the video box. I'm in "learn to use" mode right now and I try different things to test it. Yesterday I was parked under some high voltage transmission lines shooting White-faced Ibis landing into the wind between rain showers. On a whim I held the Zoom out of my window and pointed it directly at the power lines. It picked up the crackle of the corona on the power lines (when they get wet it sounds like frying bacon). I'm looking forward to using it in a wildlife setting. The camera won't record stereo. With the right setup I can record 4 channel audio Zoom. It allows me to create folders. I can rename the audio file with the panel controls. It does WAV and MP3 (and others but that's all I care about. It will convert the recorded version to another version. It uses an SD card and to download the card you just plug it in to your USB port and it's recognized as a USB drive.

    I'm new to video. I am using the audio software that came with Adobe Premiere 5.5 (Adobe has a heck of deal going on this software right now). It's called Adobe Audition and so far I'm impressed with how easy it is to use. Premiere Pro is also very easy to use. After Affects is still a work in progress for me I move to Premier Pro from Final Cut Express. I'm an Apple fan but FCE is their entry level video editing software and the learning curve on it is much steeper than the Adobe suite. I suppose that it's because I am familiar with Adobe's CS software.

    My thoughts on why DSLR video hasn't taken off (arguably it has. It's just not the Wildebeest migration that DSLR photography has become)-

    To me it's simple- The market is flooded with good, cost effective DSLR's. This has opened the door to everyone who ever wanted to be a photographer but was turned off by the results of their first roll of film. The auto function on most DSLR's is very good and the average person can produce pretty good images. Then a sub-group of the "new shooters" begins to seek improvement so they get a copy of Photoshop and begin the task of learning the digital darkroom. Personally I think that the digital darkroom is harder to learn than the fundamentals of using a camera. At some point, unless you want to be Scott Kelby, the digital darkroom becomes a comfortable place to work. The learning curve isn't steep and it's easy to get personal satisfaction if you put a small amount of effort into it.

    Then there is the person (like me) that started shooting film early, migrated to digital at mid-life, and entered the digital darkroom at the same time. The digital darkroom was and still is fascinating to me.

    Now we have digital video at our fingertips. Video comes with many more challenges. Stability is important in still photography but, especially when posting on the web, you can get away with hand holding a 600mm lens if you crank the shutter speed up. Not so with video. Any unintended movement is distracting in a video. Video is a story telling mode of capture. If you don't have a plan you are basically filling your card with B roll (side note- mixing stills with video works pretty well. For that matter stills as a video works pretty well. See Ken Burns videos as an example). If you don't have a good sound track you have a silent film. Those were great way back when, today we want to hear something that goes with the video. So one must begin the task of learning audio recording or at least have good access to audio files. Video has a whole new layer of terms to learn. Video editing is as much a part of the creative process as the actual shoot. The most important part of shooting a video happens BEFORE you capture the first pixel (not counting b roll). The short version is that planning / shooting / editing good (or great) video is a much more involved process and most people aren't interested in putting the effort into it. Some of us need to be challenged. That's where creative Photoshop skills, time lapse, and video come in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Clark View Post
    Norm,
    If you use any VR lens, the noise from the VR will be recorded by the internal microphone. Even a simple $50 microphone that mounts in the hot shoe mount and is isolated (e.g. rubber mount) will do a much better job.

    Roger
    I have to turn IS off with my Canons when shooting video. Noise isn't an issue because I use off camera recording but IS, when shooting from a tripod, introduces motion into the video.

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    Tascam has a new recorder out, the DR-40, that has XLR inputs and the cost is about $200. The only disadvantage to note in comparison to the DR-100 is lack of L/R mic gain.

    Re large sensor vs. small sensor, another factor to consider which is the low light performance of the large vs. small sensor, so you may have some advantage in terms of noise in low light situations. Canon will be making an announcement on Nov. 3 which most folks are interpreting as the release of a new cinema camera to compete with the Red and Sony F3. Hopefully they'll come out with something having a form factor that's more amenable to shooting outdoors, documentary type filming.

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